Friday Flashback – Girly Alphabet – New Freebie Design

Hello and welcome to another Friday Flashback.  This week I am bringing you a really cute collection – the Girly Alphabet.

Girly Alphabet got it’s start when I was sending the twins (Emma and Grace) off to daycare one day a week.  Now it’s not like the girls look (or looked) anything alike – Gracie’s hair was in ringlets, and Emma’s is dead straight – however the daycare had a lot of trouble working out which twin was which.

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I really didn’t want to put their entire name on a shirt – we hear so much these days about stranger danger, and I didn’t want to take any chances, however I figured a decorative letter might prompt the teachers, and not too much like a “hello my name is …” shirt.

And thus the Girly Alphabet was born.

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At it’s heart, the Girly Alphabet is a set of beautifully appliqued and stitched block letters, however each letter is also highlighted with a girly element, such as a flower, butterfly, or a bee.

I began with the applique, and I had recently seen a set of beautiful designs completed in applique, that were finished with an extra row of stitching.  I really thought this finished the designs off really well, and looked incredibly professional, and so I decided to try this on these letters.  The other change that I made to standard applique, is that my applique stitch is slightly thicker, meaning that there is more coverage, and errant threads don’t pop through quite so easily.

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One of the tricks that I have learnt over the years with machine embroidery applique, is that when you are creating clothing, ALWAYS use a fusible web on the fabric, to ensure that when you wash the shirt, it won’t warp or distort.

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Once I had created the letters, I then began adding the highlights, using cutsie elements.  I have used basic stitches for these, to add extra dimension to the designs.

I had a lot of fun with these designs.  As well as making the shirts for the girls (only one of them had to wear the shirt each week), I also created a beautiful wallhanging using Emma’s name.

The story of the wallhanging really brings a smile to my face.  On the day that I was creating this, Emma was being “extra” challenging.  So as I was using beautiful words to describe my gorgeous daughter, I was thinking alternative words.

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To create the wallhanging I layed out the letters making Emma, and then used my software to add the rest of the letters to form the words.

Initially we gave away the lovley tulip element from the Girly Alphabet collections.  If you missed these the first time around, you can collect your copy from our free designs page HERE.  As a thank you to all of our loyal customers, for the next week we are also offering the letter L – as a free download.  Simply click HERE to collect your copy.

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Thank you for taking this trip down memory lane with me, I hope you have enjoyed looking at this collection, and that it has inspired you to stitch for a loved one.

Until next time, have a Stitchin’ Day.  Julie.

 

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Friday Flashback – Gracie G. Raffe – Huge Discount

Welcome back to another Friday Flashback, taking a look back at some of my favourite classic collections.

This week I am bringing you a really cute stuffed animal – Gracie G. Raffe.

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Gracie G is named after my own beautiful Gracie G(irl), as everyone else already had a collection named after them, and it was her turn.

Gracie G came about as a lot of other digitizers were creating stuffed animals at the time, with each piece being made in the hoop (many of them in a crazy patch style), and then being pieced together in the end.

I loved the idea of this, and decided to try my own hand.  It was a toss up as to whether to create an elephant, or a giraffe.  In the end, I went with the Giraffe, simply because I could name it after Gracie.

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I digitized and created Gracie G over a 4 day weekend one November.  At that time, the girls were still in nappies, and we were living in Melbourne.  As a treat each Melbourne Cup (horserace) Day weekend, my hubby would go away camping, and drop the children off with his mother on his way out.  So I had from Friday night, to Tuesday all to myself to create.  I can remember sitting in front of the machine, at about 3 in the morning, trying to get one piece right, but it was a great weekend.

Gracie G Raffe is created piece by piece in the hoop, with the design consisting of flowered panels, and then the pattern stitching out.  You cut the pattern out at the end, with seam allowance added, and you will have all of your pattern pieces ready to go.  You then construct the Giraffe once all of the embroidery is created.

I did have a couple of issues with the Gracie G Raffe collection.  When I test sew my designs, I will do different designs (in the collection) in different machines, which normally works wonderfully, however in this instance, the Bernina and Brother brands of machines did not like the long satin stitch that I had created for the mane.  Unfortunately due to the way I tested the design, I didn’t realise this until after the pattern had been released, and I had to immediately create a multi layered mane with shorter satin stitches that would still give the same result.

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The construction of Gracie G is quite simple, however it must be done in the correct order.  One of the parts that people have a little trouble with is the base of the giraffe, and after a lot of speaking with customers, we found that it was the paper size – the joys of working internationally.

There is no real purpose in giving away part of the giraffe design, however I really wanted to be able to thank you for taking the time to read this post, so for the next two weeks, I am giving a 50% off discount for the purchase of Gracie.  To get your discount, use the code FLASHBACK in the discount code section at checkout.

Thank you for taking this trip down memory lane with me, I hope you have enjoyed looking at this collection, and that it has inspired you to stitch for a loved one.

Until next time, have a Stitchin’ Day.  Julie.

Friday Flashback – Sugar & Spice/Snips & Snails New Freebies

Welcome back to another Friday Flashback, taking a look back at some of my favourite classic collections.

This week I am bringing you two collections that kind of go together – Snips and Snails and Sugar & Spice.

I can remember as a child I had a grandparent who was partial to girls rather than my brother, and she would recite the poem “what are little girls made of…. Sugar and Spice, and Everything Nice….what are little boys made of….Snips and Snails and Puppy Dogs Tails….”  Now I don’t totally go for the whole gender role thing of girls are sweet and boys are muddy, however the name always stuck in my head.

The idea for this collection began with seeing some amazing artwork based around little girls.  I really wanted something that was quick to stitch out, and at the time, I hadn’t worked on any redwork collections.

So redwork was my style of choice for these gorgeous girls.  I found that I had so much fun creating these designs, that once I got started, in no time I had 16 gorgeous girls.  I like to think there is something for everyone in this collection – there is the little girl at the party, cooking, picking up frogs, dancing are all covered in this sweet collection.

I was so proud of the collection at the time (remember back in 2008), not many machines had thread trimmers on them, and these designs are all created to have no jump stitches except for the eyes.

As I was test stitching the collection, I found that using black thread made the designs look incredibly harsh, and I had to switch to a dark brown thread.  This trick has worked for me for more than 10 years now, giving a much softer and natural appearance to my embroidery designs.  The other interesting thing that happened as I was test stitching these designs, was Cameron (then 4) asking where the boys were?

And so the Snips and Snails collection was began as well.  Once again, using the same artist, the Snips and Snails collection gives 16 different traditional boy designs, with the sweet boys engaging in BBQing, playing super hero, policeman, fishing, and skateboarding.

Over the years, I have used the designs are a quick way to embellish items (each design only takes about 10 minutes), and the designs are brilliant for applying paints to for an added dimension.

The first items that I created with these designs were the quilts.  They are so easy to make, and are a great gift.  I have also used the designs for birth samplers successfully, and even used the designs in a binder cover that I still use to this day.

Initially we gave away the very pretty faces for two of these designs HERE as a freebie with the Snips & Snails and Sugar & Spice Design collections.  As a thank you to all of our loyal customers, for the next week we are also offering a second design from each collection – as a free download.  Simply click HERE to collect your copy.

Thank you for taking this trip down memory lane with me, I hope you have enjoyed looking at this collection, and that it has inspired you to stitch for a loved one.

Until next time, have a Stitchin’ Day.  Julie.

Friday Flashback – Antique Sewing Machines – Beautiful Free Design

Hello, and thank you for joining us for another Friday Flashback.

This week I am happy to bring to you a beautiful collection called Antique Sewing Machines.

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This collection was created approximately 9 years ago, and is still one of my favourites.

I can remember my grandmother had a classic singer treadle back in the 70’s that we used to love to play on, and that is one of my favourite memories of her.

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A few years ago, my darling husband found me a classic singer treadle that needed some work, and brought it for me.  Now we have barely done any work on it yet, but I still love the machine.

I specifically asked the artist that I work with to create me a collection of classic machines.  I wanted something that was full of detail, and looked “real” rather than cartoonish.

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I have an amazing artist that I work with, who has an amazing skill for creating exactly what I need and want.

I was thrilled when I got the files to work on, they had totally exceeded my expectations.

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These designs took a lot of work.  On average, there are between 13000 and 15000 stitches in each design.  It was also a time in machine embroidery where not all machines had jump stitch cutters and I was very careful when I created the designs to ensure that there were no unnecessary jump stitches in the designs, giving a lovely smooth stitch out.

There are 15 designs in the Antique Sewing Machine Collection, and I can still remember back to 2009 when I first created these how happy I was when they were stitching out beautifully.

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I initially created a beautiful lap rug with these designs, and I have spent the last 3 weeks looking for it, so that I could photograph it and share it with you.  Unfortunately I cannot find it for the life of me. (although I have now photographed and arranged everything else).  The laprug was made up of 12 different sewing machine designs, stitched out on white fabric, with a medium/dark gray thread.  I love using gray thread instead of black, as it softens the look of the embroidery, and gives it a very antique look.

When I put the blocks of the quilt together, I tilted the blocks off centre, and used a border of soft floral fabric.  I was then even inspired to quilt through all of the layers of the lap rug and finish it (something I rarely do).

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I also made a couple of wallhangings with these designs, however never really loved any of them.  Up until I got busy this week!

I can also remember going to a shop in Queensland, to find the staff had used these designs to decorate the back of their shirts for work.  I thought this was a really innovative idea, and really turns a plain shirt, into a “work only” shirt.

Here you can see my latest two favourite wall hanging’s.  One shows this weekends forecast, and the other is showing the power of the sewing machine.  You can purchase these wallhanging designs for $9.95 each HERE.

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Initially when I created this collection, we gave away a small sample of the needle and thread part of the machine.  You can access this design HERE.  Now I realise that I have been very lax over the past month, and have not been keeping up with my Friday Flashbacks, so for the next week, I am offering the Power Tool sewing machine design as a free download.  This offer will expire in 7 days, so don’t hesitate to get your copy NOW.

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I hope you have enjoyed this flashback, and are inspired to stitch out your own Antiques.

Until next time, have a Stitchin’ Day.  Julie.

Friday Flash Back – Christmas in July – All That Glitters Christmas

One of the things that I love about the concept of Christmas in July – as well as being able to celebrate with the weather the opposite part of the hemisphere enjoys – is that it starts me thinking about what I am going to be creating this Christmas.

Thank you for joining me today for our Christmas in July Friday Flashback. This week we are looking at a wonderful collection – All That Glitters Christmas.

All that Glitters – Christmas was the first Christmas collection that I created using Iridescent Embroidery Film (Mylar).

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Back when I created these designs in 2011, Iridescent Film was still fairly new in Australia (I had first brought this back from a buying trip in late 2009). Whilst I had created many other collections using this film, it was the first time I had tackled a christmas collection.

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I fell in love with these designs because of their simplicity. I am a less is more kind of Christmas person, and I really love the elegant look these designs have.

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Whilst the designs give the appearance of being a single colour, there is a layer of colour matching thread under the detail stitching, which holds down the Iridescent Film.

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This collection is a massive collection, including a total of 20 different designs. There are 10 designs that are individual elements, and 10 designs that are Christmas baubles, with swirly detail.

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I have had a wonderful time with these designs over the years. The first Christmas I used these designs, I created serviettes, with the design right in the middle of the serviette, and then rolled the serviette so that it resembled a Christmas cracker, with the ends tied with ribbon.  I keep on hinting that this would be a wonderful way for my darling husband to gift me a beautiful piece of jewellery at Christmas, but at the time of writing, he still hasn’t taken the hint.

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I have also completed a larger project, using the Christmas baubles with the swirly details to create a tablecloth. When you are creating a tablecloth, the important things are to measure everything from the centre of the tablecloth, and always use templates.

Other ways that I could really see these designs going well would be on a mantle cloth above a fireplace (I can just imagine firelight glinting off the Iridescent Film), or on a table runner.

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For some reason, I have only ever stitched these designs using a gold tone thread. Not metallic – but I have a wonderful thread that is gold in tone, almost to the point of having a little green in it.  For some reason, this thread really works well for these designs, and I have always used this colour.  Having said that, I could also see the designs working well with a forest green, or burgundy thread for a more traditional Christmas look.

When we first released the All that Glitters Christmas designs, we gave away the beautiful small Christmas bauble design as a freebie (you can find it HERE). For the next week, as a thank you to all of our loyal readers, we are also offering another design from this collection. Click HERE to download yours today.

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I hope you have enjoyed this flashback, and I would love to see pictures of your own Christmas stitching. Until next time, as always, have a Stitchin’ Day.  Julie.

Friday Flashback – Christmas in July – Christmas Trapunto

One of the things that I love about the concept of Christmas in July – as well as being able to celebrate with the weather the opposite part of the hemisphere enjoys – is that it starts me thinking about what I am going to be creating this Christmas.

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Thank you for joining me today for our Christmas in July Friday Flashback. This week we are looking at a wonderful collection – Christmas Trapunto.

Christmas Trapunto was actually the 3rd Christmas collection that I ever created, and I really wanted to work with a 3d style formula.  I had fallen in love with the designs, and wanted to continue the “stuffed” look and features of the designs in thread.

Traditional trapunto is created by first completing the stitching, and then “stuffing” it with wool. The word trapunto – from the Italian for “to quilt,” is a method of quilting that is also called “stuffed technique.” A puffy, decorative feature, trapunto utilizes at least two layers, the underside of which is slit and padded, producing a raised surface on the quilt.

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This method was not going to work as well for machine embroidery, so we had to re-think the process.

The idea that I came up with was to use a technique where you could stitch down a high loft wadding onto a cutaway stabiliser, trim away the excess, then add the cotton top fabric and stitch all of the details.  Using this method, you get the dimension, and yet everything is done in the hoop.

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One of the things that I really love about these designs is that you don’t HAVE to do them in trapunto. Each of the designs come in both redwork and trapunto style, so if you want to create simple stitching, you can.

There are 12 different designs in the Trapunto Christmas collection, and they all have that same chunky look. Trapunto is a great technique for beginners as well, as it is so easy to create, and yet really looks like an advanced technique.

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I have used these designs in a couple of different ways, firstly I created a magnificent Christmas Tree Skirt. The tree skirt featured all 12 of the designs that are a part of the collection, and after I completed the skirt, a wonderful friend of mine (Anne Conway – designer/artist) painted my skirt to add extra detail.  You could use a similar technique to what Anne used by using JoSonja paints, and textile medium, or nowadays, there are the Derwent Inktense pencils that will help you to easily add artistic elements to your embroidery.

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I have also used the red work version of these designs for a Christmas stocking. You can simply make the stocking – or santa sack, using these designs, and the wording of the intended childs name.

When we first released the Christmas Trapunto designs, we gave away the fun candy cane as the freebie design. For the next week, as a thank you to all of our loyal readers, we are also offering another design from this collection. Click HERE to download yours today.

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I hope you have enjoyed this flashback, and I would love to see pictures of your own Christmas stitching. Until next time, as always, have a Stitchin’ Day.  Julie.

Friday Flashback – Christmas in July – Conway Christmas Bears

Thank you for joining me today, and I apologise for the lateness of the Friday Flashback post (it is the last week of school holidays, and as well as working on my own business, I have been helping out doing some corporate training, and taking care of the kids as well). Today I would like to re-introduce you to an fantastic set of Christmas Designs – Conway Christmas Bears, as part of our Christmas in July Celebrations.

The Conway Christmas Bears were created back in 2006/2007, and were the second set of Conway bears that I had created. Once again, the designs came from my friend, and amazing artist – Anne Conway.  Anne had come to one of my embroidery classes, and brought along a beautiful Christmas tree design, featuring bears stacked up like the tree.

I immediately fell in love, and begged for Anne to let me re-create these amazing designs for Machine Embroidery.

Each Bear (and there are 10 in the set), are created in complete fill stitch. The fill that I use is created to give a texture to emulate fur, whilst the edging is in a jagged style adding extra dimension.   Additionally, each bear has individual added detailing, such as their Santa hats, or their vests, some are holding presents, some antlers etc.  They really do all have their own personalities.

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Probably one of the favourite things that I have created with these designs, was replicating Anne’s own Christmas Tree Bear Design concept. I lay out the bears using my layout software, and one by one embroidered them all onto a single piece of fabric.  I can still remember working on this project, I had just purchased a new machine, and after laying out the designs so that I could fit it into two large hoopings, I began stitching.  Everything was fine, and I was up to the second day of stitching, until right at the end, when the last bear (or the machine) ran out of oomph, and pulled the fabric out of the hoop, and inside the machine.  After taking a few hours away from the designs, and a lot of swearing, I decided that I was not going to waste the design that I had created, and stitched the last bear onto a separate piece of fabric, and then appliqued him on before I quilted the wall hanging.  I still have the wallhanging, and bring it out each Christmas to hang in the entry way of our home.

Another project that I created with these great bears was a couple of t-shirts for the girls. The girls would have been two the Christmas after these guys came out, and it would have been their first Christmas walking (being twins, they were not the fastest walkers).   I made them the t-shirts, and stitched a bell onto the hat of the bears.  For a month, this shirt was the girls favourite, and had them jumping up and down so that they could make their shirts jingle.

When we first brought out this collection, I gave out the bears hat as a freebie design. As a special offer to our loyal readers, for the next two weeks we are also offering the gorgeous teddy bear with the scarf design as a free give away.  Simply click HERE to download your copy.

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I hope you have enjoyed this flashback, and as always, have a Stitchin’ Day. Julie.

Free Project Instructions – Gingerbread House

Looking for a gift that is just that little bit different. I am making this gorgeous gingerbread house gift box for many of my family and friends this year, and to make it extra special, filling it with homemade treats. The house is a gorgeous addition to anyone’s Christmas decorating, and can be used for many years to come.

Requirements List

  • ½m Ginger coloured Felt
  • 80x40cm lining fabric (I have used a Christmas print)
  • 1 piece of thick cardboard (I used a 2mm thick boxboard – available from art
  • supply stores)
  • PVA glue
  • Hot glue gun
  • Embroidery threads
  • Stabiliser
  • Stanley Knife or Rotary cutter (for cardboard)
  • 4 clothes pegs
  • Embroidery Machine
  • Sewing Machine with a three step zigzag
  • Gingerbread House Design collection by Julie Hall Designs

Instructions

  1. Take the felt and cut into 2 strips, wide enough to fit your embroidery hoop
  2. Layer stabiliser and felt and hoop up, and embroider all 7 designs to form the house.
    house1
  3. Using a pair of sharp dressmakers scissors, cut around each of the designs as close as possible without trimming the outline threads (Hint: I don’t suggest using rotary cutter for this step, as I constantly trimmed the threads trying to get close enough).
    house2
  4. Take the base and 4 sides, and join together with a three step zig zag (I used a width setting of 6 and a length of .3)
    house3
  5. Take the two roof sections, and join together in the same manner.
    house4
  6. Using the same 3 step zig zag stitch, join up the side panels to create the box. (Hint: One of the fabulous things about felt is the way it recovers itself after being distorted. Don’t worry too much about manipulating the fabric to join together, it will return to it’s former shape once steamed with an iron.)
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  7. Using the templates provided, trace the outlines onto the cardboard, 3 base and square sides, 2 gabled sides, and two roof sections.
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  8. Using a rotary cutter or Stanley knife, carefully cut out the cardboard. Take the PVA Glue, and place a fine film over each of the cardboard pieces, set aside until tacky.
  9. Take your lining fabric, and press with an iron.
  10. Lay the lining fabric out, and arrange the cardboard on (as per the picture), leaving a 2mm gap between each piece. Leave to dry.
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  11. Trim around the cardboard layout leaving approximately 1 – 1.5cm around each edge.
  12. Take the PVA and run a bead around each of the top edges of the cardboard. Pull the fabric around to be adhered by the glue. Leave to dry.
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  13. Take the roof section, run a bead of PVA around all edges, and pull fabric around to adhere. Leave to dry.
  14. Turn the cardboard and fabric over so that the fabric side is up., and there the two pieces of fabric will join to form the sides, run a bead of PVA glue. Pull all sides up to form the box, and secure to dry with the 4 pegs.
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  15. Remove the pegs from the cardboard, and place the fabric covered box into the embroidered box.
  16. Take the roof section lining and embroidered roof, run a bead of glue around the lining, and join both sections together. Leave to dry.
  17. Take your PVA glue and run a bead of glue between the fabric box and the embroidered box. I take the iron out here and press all sides which assists in the glue drying, and gives a pressed, square look to the box.
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  18. Take out the hot glue gun, and (working quickly), run a bead of hot glue around one side of the house (from roof top to roof top).
  19. Quickly place the roof onto the house, and hold down for 20 seconds to secure.
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  20. You will now have one side of the house open to put your “gift” in, whilst the other side is secure and will not be lost.

I hope you enjoy this tutorial, and remember, for the next week, you can get this fantastic design for 50% off, using the code INJULY at checkout.  Click HERE to find the design on our website.

Until next time, have a Stitchin’ Day.  Julie.

Friday Flashback – Christmas in July – Gingerbread House Designs

 

Hello, and thank you so much for taking the time to read this blog post. All this month, we are celebrating Christmas in July, by taking a look at a few of my favourite Christmas Designs.  This week I am going to focus on the first ever Christmas design that I created.  The Gingerbread House

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This gingerbread house is soooo cute. Made entirely out of felt, and lined with cardboard and fabric, the gingerbread house is the perfect accompaniment for any Christmas table.

I made this house in 2006, the same year that I began Julie Hall designs. At that time, there was no product available in Australia called stitch and shape (although if I had waited an extra year…..) so I had to find a way to support the box by myself.

My plan with the gingerbread house was to create a design that really did look like you have decorated a piece of gingerbread with lollies and sweets. There is a lot of stitching involved in this design, and each piece, whilst created in the hoop, is then pieced together with a sewing machine.  I actually re-stitched this house 2 years ago as a gift for someone, and I was so happy with the changes in technology since I developed this design, simply the thread trimming will save you a lot of time with this design.  I really love the way the edges of the gingerbread house have a brick like texture to look like real brick work.

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The gingerbread house was created to fit perfectly into a 5×7 hoop, making the overall size of the house approximately 18x12x25cm. I love that I can load up the box with wrapped lollies, and have quite a treat all laid out.

Some of the tricks that I learnt whilst I was creating this design was in the art of joining pieces together.

  • Instead of using a basic zig-zag stitch, try going for a three part zig-zag, which will give you a much more secure join.
  • Use the spray glue sparingly, in a well ventilated area, I can still remember coughing all around the kitchen for a few hours after putting together a few of these without the door open and the air vent on.
  • Don’t attempt to place multiple pieces into the hoop (even though the hoop these days are larger). You will end up distorting (pulling) the felt, and will more than likely be dissatisfied with the result.

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Unfortunately, due to the nature of this design, I am unable to give away half of the house as a free design.  Instead, what I am offering all of my loyal readers is the opportunity to purchase these designs for half price.  For the next week, we are offering this gorgeous Christmas Design for half price.  Simply use the discount code INJULY at checkout.

Over the next few days, I will also be sharing with you the tutorial for this great house.  Keep your eye out for this great tutorial. Enjoy.

Once again, thank you for taking the time to read this post, and as always, have a Stitchin’ Day. Julie.

Free Project – Old Fisherman Lap Rug

This detailed, bold and masculine laprug/wallhanging will be a welcome addition to any fisherman’s house.  Choose your favourite fabrics from your stash (I actually used Christmas fabrics for this one, and it blends perfectly).

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Finished Size

38” square (97cm)

Requirements

  • 65cm of seeded homespun
  • 1m Green fabric (blocks + border +binding
  • 60cm Yellow (blocks + border)
  • 25cm Red (blocks)
  • 25cm Blue (blocks)
  • 25cm Tan (blocks)
  • Gone Fishing designs by Julie Hall Designs
  • Embroidery Threads to match your project (or see colour sheet with Gone finishing
  • designs)
  • Tearaway stabiliser
  • 1m fabric for backing
  • 1m wadding
  • Neutral coloured sewing thread
  • Matboard, Rotary Cutter, Ruler
  • ¼” sewing foot

Instructions

  1. Take the seeded homespun, and cut into 4 x 12” blocks
  2. Using a tear away stabiliser, embroider the designs for the quilt into the block.
  3. Trim all 4 embroidered blocks to 11 1/8” square.
    laprug2
  4. From the green, yellow, blue and red fabrics, cut a strip 8 ¾” long
  5. From the strip, cut 1 squares 8 ¾”
  6. Cut the squares into triangles across both diagonals – leaving you with 4 triangles.
  7. From the tan fabric, but 1 strips 8 ¾” long
  8. Cut the squares into triangles across both diagonals – leaving you with 12 triangles.
  9. Using the picture below, begin stitching the blue, green, yellow and red fabrics to the tan to form large triangles. Press
    laprug3
  10. Attach the large triangles to the embroidered diamonds to form 4 large squares.
  11. Join the squares together, being careful to match the join points.
    laprug4
  12. From the yellow fabric, cut 4 2½” strips. Join
  13. Working first with the top and bottom, and then on the two sides, join strips of the yellow to the quilt. Press.
  14. From the green fabric, cut 4 x 4” strips. Join
  15. Working first with the top and bottom, and then on the two sides, join strips of  green fabric to the quilt. Press
    laprug5
  16. You are now ready to add wadding and backing, to your quilt, and quilt as you please. I chose to ditch stitch through all of the blocks along the join lines, and then use the borders to create an echo quilting outline, in a diamond pattern. It is also at this stage that you can add a rod pocket if you plan on using this as a wall hanging.

Enjoy